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Author Topic: "Death of a Gamesman"  (Read 2793 times)

ShadowBrain

  • Ridiculously relevant
« on: October 14, 2008, 07:42:04 PM »
http://www.gamese****ch.com/2008/10/opinion_chewing_pixels_death_of_a_gamesman.php

I didn't know where to post this or if it even deserved a thread. I just thought it was really quite interesting and I wanted to share it.
"Mario is your oyster." ~The Chef

« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2008, 07:46:25 PM »
Part of the URL is censored, so it only leads to http://www.gamese/.

MaxVance

  • Vance Vance Revolution
« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2008, 07:57:15 PM »
The URL works for me since I have the censors off. Here is a tinyurl redirect for those who like the censors.

Edit after reading the article: This was a nice read, if a bit confusing at first. He does bring up an interesting point that we go through numerous deaths in our games with little regard for them.
« Last Edit: October 14, 2008, 08:04:19 PM by MaxVance »
Remember that your first Goomba boldly you walk? When Mario touched that mushroom being brought up more largely remember that you are surprised? Miscalculate your jump that pit remember that it falls?

ShadowBrain

  • Ridiculously relevant
« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2008, 08:07:40 PM »
Part of the URL is censored, so it only leads to http://www.gamese/.
What part of it is an... oh.

One time, on another site, I tried to post a picture of a yoshi toy, but the url... well, just read between the lines there.
"Mario is your oyster." ~The Chef

« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2008, 12:58:14 PM »
What? Chewing?

« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2008, 01:00:31 PM »
Maybe the filter should be smarter to not filter words in URLs. There was an online article (or blog post, can't remember) pointing out some unfortunate names for websites, where you could read the URL in the wrong way. I think if reading it the wrong way still leads to actual English words, we're much more likely to pick up on the unfortunate words than if it's just in the middle somewhere. I can see the problem with Yoshi toy, but I know the words Yoshi and toy, so I wouldn't be able to read it any other way unless I made a conscious effort to.

So yeah, tinyurl is nice. Alright, anyway, topic.


I rarely think about what good playing videogames does. For the most part I do see it as taking away from other activities, that foremost games are to entertain. I know games could help improve hand-eye coordination and possibly throw other life lessons at you (I remember one person sending a letter to Nintendo Power stating that he didn't want to learn "stop, drop and roll" when someone is on fire. When playing one of the Army Men games where you're a green plastic army dude, you have to stop drop and roll to put yourself out if you catch on fire, otherwise you melt and die. So he remarked that he ended up learning it anyway since it was needed for success in the game). But for the most part, they're to entertain. If life has you bummed and you feel like punching something or breaking down from stress, a good movie or videogame might calm you down.

You might be able to get a career related to videogames if you're so dedicated to them that you analyze them and learn what works and what doesn't. Same with being, say, a movie critic or art critic. It'd take a humongous amount of work and bribery and such, but it could be an option since you have experience with them and like playing/watching them. Only caveat is that you'll have to learn to love math if you ever have to get into coding or graphics.

I know the guy in the article had the question spark off an intense self-reflection which prompted a response that had deep meaning for him, but I bet that deep meaning was lost on the little girl. I think a more appropriate response for the girl would be to take the question at face value and answer which game seemed most entertaining and inspirational. I also fear there may be a disconnect, that we may point to one of our first games or games during our childhood as one of the best, yet someone hearing about that game 20 years later might think "that old thing? What are you, crazy?" There are countless exceptions, considering the many amazing games that have been released over the years, but will the answer mean much if someone has never even heard of the game?

Everyone knows Tetris and its addictive qualities, though. That's usually a safe bet for favorite game.

When I recognize a game as being one of my favorites, I know I mostly think about how I felt, but it's also a chance to recognize when everything in the game came together in harmony and the genius of the people involved. That this was a game the creators could be proud of. I listen to the music in the Donkey Kong Country series and I'm reminded of being surprised how beautiful videogame music could sound. I could return to that game for the music alone, you know, if it weren't for the rest of the awesome in it. Some games are timeless (or in your mind they are because you loved the games to begin with) and you're in awe to see this sort of passion that went into the games. Continuing with the rosy-tinted theme, I think these developers wanted to show something new to the world, reveal their own creations, and take pride not only in seeing their work realized but also the appreciation when someone plays their game and smiles.

...and then maybe after that they're concerned about the money they'll make.
You didn't say wot wot.

Glorb

  • Banned
« Reply #6 on: October 15, 2008, 02:20:47 PM »
The censor made me laugh. I mean, the last time I heard someone use that word was, like, never. At least not on a forum.
every

ShadowBrain

  • Ridiculously relevant
« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2008, 02:46:26 PM »
Maybe the filter should be smarter to not filter words in URLs. There was an online article (or blog post, can't remember) pointing out some unfortunate names for websites, where you could read the URL in the wrong way.
Pen Island, folks. You'll be glad you went.
"Mario is your oyster." ~The Chef

« Reply #8 on: October 15, 2008, 02:50:59 PM »
You lied, Shadow.

« Reply #9 on: October 15, 2008, 02:59:49 PM »
What a joke.
ROM hacking with a slice of life.

ShadowBrain

  • Ridiculously relevant
« Reply #10 on: October 15, 2008, 03:05:18 PM »
Heck, I didn't even dare see if the site was still around. I just heard there was a (understandable) bit of controversy surrounding the URL penisland.com a while back.
"Mario is your oyster." ~The Chef

« Reply #11 on: October 15, 2008, 03:08:12 PM »
Kay then. Thanks for the answer.

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