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Author Topic: The GRAD thread: Discuss your post-secondary education plans here!  (Read 33589 times)

« Reply #15 on: June 03, 2010, 03:39:47 AM »
I'm entering my third year of college, and applied for a minor in History and possibly Psychology. I'm not putting all my eggs in one basket especially with a market as competitive as Graphic Design.

It's a funny story. I pretty much made it into my 12th year not really caring where my life was heading. I ended up being forced to meet with my school's counselor to discuss my plans. When she heard I hadn't even applied to a single college at that point (It was like mid-November or so), she panicked and got me a bunch of exemption passes so I wouldn't pay to take the last SAT and ACT test of the year. I was acting like Light Yagami towards anyone who found out, but truthfully if she didn't do that I would've been ****ed since I had no intention to attend a community college.

So I signed up to like 4 colleges since that's about the limit the exemptions had for me, and ended up not submitting half of them. Then the months passed and my acceptance letters didn't come in until mid-May for me. People around me were panicking once again because they were afraid I was rejected, but I ended up being accepted by the only two I applied for. I ended up choosing the one farther away from home because everyone else was going to the local one and I didn't want to spend anymore time around them. Then once again, I didn't pay my tuition fees until the very last day due to FAFSA being stupid and insisting on some incredibly obscure piece of info to give me my money and I spent my first week in a hotel because I never managed to look for an apartment during the summer.

So as of now, the only thing college has taught me is that I'm incredibly lazy and unmotivated if there's no one there to tell me to keep going.
As a game that requires six friends, an HDTV, and skill, I can see why the majority of TMK is going to hate on it hard.

« Reply #16 on: June 03, 2010, 08:57:50 PM »
So as of now, the only thing college has taught me is that I'm incredibly lazy and unmotivated if there's no one there to tell me to keep going.

That's my primary concern. I'd be failing everything as is, were it not for teachers constantly egging me on. Perhaps doing something I'm actually interested in will provide sufficient motivation during college.

University is considered the standard for graduates from my school, but whatever. A useless degree from Pricksworth University doesn't seem worth the effort. Aside from the Asian kids who are ALL going into accounting, most of my classmates will be going into science or engineering.
YYur  waYur n beYur you Yur plusYur instYur an Yur Yur whaYur

« Reply #17 on: June 04, 2010, 05:49:41 PM »
Don't worry too much about it. Spend enough time on campus and you'll find something worth doing. Took me about 3 mediocre semesters to get back into it anyway, and I'm still pretty unsure of my immediate future. For now, I'm just having fun and learning whatever I can and exploring options.

I also got over my dead arcade and scouted all the stores in the area. Finally found a Toys R Us so I will no longer miss out on their Buy 2 Get 1 Free sales or the promotional Pokemon.
As a game that requires six friends, an HDTV, and skill, I can see why the majority of TMK is going to hate on it hard.

« Reply #18 on: June 04, 2010, 07:13:09 PM »
Keeping myself entertained shouldn't be too great an issue, seeing as I'll be going home every day. The college is a half-hour drive from our house.
YYur  waYur n beYur you Yur plusYur instYur an Yur Yur whaYur

« Reply #19 on: June 09, 2010, 10:35:52 PM »
In order to be eligible for the radio broadcasting course I'd been planning to take, the Media Programs Admission Assessment must first be passed. The test consist of 40 English-comprehension questions, 80 multiple-choice questions regarding Canadian culture, and an essay.

My English score was 111/120, apparently within the 95th percentile.

I scored 55/120 on the Canadian culture section, which is impressive considering HOW ****ING OBSCURE THE QUESTIONS WERE. For example, "Which of the following individuals was not a Canadian astronaut?" ... "Which of these phrases was coined by Marshall McLuhan?" ... "The Winter Light Festival is held annually in which Canadian city?" A typical Canadian wouldn't know any of those, let alone myself.

The essay was what really screwed me. Being quite slow at formulating and organizing ideas, I was unable to write a 350-600 word essay on a Mark Twain quote regarding social conformity within the 50 minutes alloted. Having only written around 240 words before the clock expired, my work didn't qualify for marking. Zero.
YYur  waYur n beYur you Yur plusYur instYur an Yur Yur whaYur

Glorb

  • Banned
« Reply #20 on: June 11, 2010, 05:06:44 PM »
I got madd wykkdd English scores back in high school and [dukar] marks on everything else aside from Civil War History in my junior year, which I had straight A's in all year (???).
every

« Reply #21 on: August 14, 2010, 06:29:52 PM »
I was informed three or four weeks after my previous post that I made it into the radio program.

I received my class schedule a few days ago. Pretty typical hours (four days a week, three to five hours per day) except for Tuesdays, for which I'll be on campus from 9:00 AM to 6:00 PM. What fun.
YYur  waYur n beYur you Yur plusYur instYur an Yur Yur whaYur

Black Mage

  • HP 1018 MP 685
« Reply #22 on: August 14, 2010, 06:36:05 PM »
Keeping myself entertained shouldn't be too great an issue, seeing as I'll be going home every day. The college is a half-hour drive from our house.

Oh man, college was so much fun. I graduated in May 2009, so I've been out for a little over a year now. I miss it a ton. But I can't recommend enough that you move out of your parents house. You'll miss out on a whole dimension of college if you're not close to your campus. You should really look into staying in the dorms or getting an apartment near by!

I've been working full time since I graduated and it's been okay. Having a decent paycheck is great and all, but having all of freedom and none of the responsibility was much more fun. There's something to be said about having a huge concentration of like-minded people your own age around all the time.

It might sound cliche, but enjoy it while you've got it!

Chupperson Weird

  • Not interested.
« Reply #23 on: August 14, 2010, 07:20:26 PM »
Haha I probably would have died if I didn't live at my house during college. I lived 2 miles from campus anyway.
That was a joke.

Black Mage

  • HP 1018 MP 685
« Reply #24 on: August 14, 2010, 07:45:34 PM »
Point's moot then, since you had the best of both worlds!

What're you doing these days Chup? I didn't realize you had graduated. My goodness, we've gotten so old!

« Reply #25 on: August 14, 2010, 07:49:55 PM »
I'm nowhere near responsible enough to live away from home. I can't clean, drive, do my own laundry or cook anything besides Kraft Dinner. Remember, you're talking to a guy who can't tie his own shoelaces.

I cannot imagine myself enjoying these forthcoming two years very much. As said before, I could barely stay motivated when teachers were constantly leaning over my shoulder, so finishing assignments for professors to whom I'm just another nameless face will prove difficult, to say the least.

As far as friends go, a small handful of my 42 high school classmates are going to Algonquin, while the vast majority are bound for various universities. Given the size of the campus, I doubt I'll see any of them too often. Going from less than 200 fellow students between kindergarten to grade 12 to over 16,000 in college will also be quite an adjustment to make.
YYur  waYur n beYur you Yur plusYur instYur an Yur Yur whaYur

Chupperson Weird

  • Not interested.
« Reply #26 on: August 14, 2010, 07:57:20 PM »
Been writing some music, playing in a band and a symphony, working a dead end job, gearing up to find ways to elevate myself to better recognition and profession... I think that's about it.
That was a joke.

Black Mage

  • HP 1018 MP 685
« Reply #27 on: August 14, 2010, 08:01:28 PM »
Those excuses won't fly! I live alone and am a terrible cook. No one taught me how to clean because it's not a skill-- it's a chore! You can do these things, it just sounds like you don't want to. You're going to have to learn someday.

It's all about your attitude. If you don't make an effort to enjoy it, then of course you won't! I went from a small town to a huge school as well. My graduating class in high school was less than 80 people.

You'll make new friends in college, but it's a lot more difficult when you're only there for classes. That's part of the experience!

I know I'm not going to convince you, but you should really stop coming up with reasons you're not going to enjoy college, and just enjoy the ride!

Chup-Edit: You gotta start somewhere! I know I wouldn't be able to handle the music industry (or art for that matter), so I've got nothing but respect for people who brave that route. Good luck!

Turtlekid1

  • Tortuga
« Reply #28 on: August 14, 2010, 08:03:35 PM »
Been writing some music, playing in a band and a symphony, working a dead end job, gearing up to find ways to elevate myself to better recognition and profession... I think that's about it.
Writing music?  If I may ask, what's the best way learn good composition skills?  I'm thinking I'm going to major in music, but I'm better at writing than performing it...
"It'll say life is sacred and so is death
but death is life and so we move on"

Chupperson Weird

  • Not interested.
« Reply #29 on: August 14, 2010, 08:32:36 PM »
Take composition lessons. From many people. I took lessons for most of my college career and I'm still not convinced I have "good" skills, but it's a start.
That was a joke.

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