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Author Topic: Sigh... where is everyone?  (Read 10115 times)

« on: December 02, 2014, 04:03:20 AM »
It's getting to the point where only mods comment here... hell, I only come here once a month
My mind is telling me no... My body is telling me no too, just so you know.

BP

  • Beside Pacific
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2014, 04:24:28 AM »
I would say internet forums are dying out, but a couple weeks ago I was googling for venison roast recipes and stumbled upon a forum about cookin' meat that gets more traffic than we do. I guess meat is, always has been, and always will be, more popular than Mario...


it's-a meat
All your dreeeeeeams begiiin to shatterrrrrr~
It's YOUR problem!

Suffix

  • Steamed
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2014, 06:02:42 AM »
Forgive me while I ramble a bit. Heh, isn't that the kind of thing Insane Steve would say? Anyway...

As a whole, I kind of feel like TMK is a living tribute to the turn-of-the-millenium "if you build it they will come" magazine-style sites, such as Zelda Legends. TMK was late to the crowdsourced Web 2.0 thingymabob (I think that's what they called it), and trusted volunteer staff can only dedicate so much of their time before they are burdened with other responsibilities, or simply grow tired. These days we have blogs with writers who make their living off attention-grabbing articles about games and other things. Perhaps Web 2.0 has replaced "posters" with "commenters."

How we interact with internet media aside, another big problem is youth recruitment. Cliched as it is, youth are the future, and necessary for maintaining communities. Youth come because they have interest, and google queries like "Mario games," "secrets," or "MIDIs." They'd come for the data and stay for the speculation on forums. Remember how we all talked about Project Dolphin, Revolution, and that weird water gun thingy Mario was getting? Guess where the kids get their speculation now? Professional blog writers, sometimes Youtubers! Or so I am led to believe.

Perhaps the biggest problem facing Nintendo sites in general, however, is that the playing field is now several times wider that the "Mario vs Sonic" wars of yore.

Turtlekid1

  • Tortuga
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2014, 08:24:31 AM »
Also, Glorb is gone.
"It'll say life is sacred and so is death
but death is life and so we move on"

Koopaslaya

  • Kansas
« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2014, 08:32:10 AM »
/\ /\ Suffix, that's a post of the year candidate if I've ever seen one.

In fact I, in my capacity as ADVANCED Poster Awards Emcee Emeritus, declare it the winner in honore.

In any event, Suffix, I do believe you're right. I would argue that those blog articles with a catch title and a list format are more than just a threat to the "magazine-style" websites like TMK. They're a plague to the internet and a bane of our intelligence. Articles like "The Top 20 Mario Moments You Won't BELIEVE," are attention grabbers, sure. But there is really a paucity of any real content in such articles.

Yes, maybe the information sources have changed. But isn't it also possible that TMK can remain the premiere resource for all things classic Mario? Maybe we can't keep up with all the new things in the gaming world. But there's a resurgence in retro gaming, especially among the younger demographic who are in many cases discovering for the first time "lost classics" or games we've always known as great. Vinyl sales are up in the music world, and I have my own ideas about why. But I also think that classic gaming might be our wheelhouse. TMK still has a great feel after all these years, and there's still a purpose to this website.

Maybe the forums will flicker out, but I still see TMK as a cornucopia of reliable Mario information.
 
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Suffix

  • Steamed
« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2014, 09:32:55 AM »
They're a plague to the internet and a bane of our intelligence. Articles like "The Top 20 Mario Moments You Won't BELIEVE," are attention grabbers, sure. But there is really a paucity of any real content in such articles.

Yes, the "Top (N)" and all Upwordy/Buzzkill/etc clickbait articles are the absolute scum of the internet, but whether or not the articles are "real" content or not is beside the point. At least there's something new to talk about-- that's why forums pop up around Youtuber communities. Even if there's not a new title or console around the corner, there's always the topics the personalities bring up to discuss.

As a game designer/programmer, I have my doubts about any significant retro resurgence. The indies 8~16 bit throwbacks are largely to save on design costs and send people our ages and above on nostalgia trips. It's not like people claim in earnest that older games "feel better" as people claim vinyl, as an analogue medium, "sounds better." I'd go further into it, but I don't feel like generating too much animosity uninvited.

Anyway, I agree that TMK has a great feel to it, that's why I called it a living tribute to the internet we grew up on.

ShadowBrain

  • Ridiculously relevant
« Reply #6 on: December 02, 2014, 12:03:50 PM »
I kind of feel like TMK is a living tribute to the turn-of-the-millenium "if you build it they will come" magazine-style sites, such as Zelda Legends. TMK was late to the crowdsourced Web 2.0 thingymabob (I think that's what they called it), and trusted volunteer staff can only dedicate so much of their time before they are burdened with other responsibilities, or simply grow tired. These days we have blogs with writers who make their living off attention-grabbing articles about games and other things. Perhaps Web 2.0 has replaced "posters" with "commenters."
This man knows what's up. Granted, nostalgia's practically currency these days, but this site means a lot to me for that, if only because it represents things that meant a lot to me growing up. I still remember the chain of events that led me from searching for info on Shiguru Miyamoto for an elementary school class project to finding the ClassicGaming network, to checking out all the trivia and fan stuff in the TMK archives over several years, to finally joining the forums in 2007 after my old haunt "Nintendomain" tanked. I've seen a lot of fellow forums and favorite sites come, go, and get retooled in those years--for better or worse--so whether the Fungi Forums keeps attracting new blood or just becomes a ramshackle pub for aging Millenials to wax nostalgic, you can guarantee I'll be popping in on the daily until somebody brings the Super Mario Bros. 3-inspired curtain down on the stage.
"Mario is your oyster." ~The Chef

Koopaslaya

  • Kansas
« Reply #7 on: December 02, 2014, 01:25:46 PM »
As a game designer/programmer, I have my doubts about any significant retro resurgence. The indies 8~16 bit throwbacks are largely to save on design costs and send people our ages and above on nostalgia trips. It's not like people claim in earnest that older games "feel better" as people claim vinyl, as an analogue medium, "sounds better." I'd go further into it, but I don't feel like generating too much animosity uninvited.

No animosity here, I think this is a worthy discussion, anyhow. I did not look to any statistics (if there even are any on this topic) to defend my claim that retro gaming might be making a resurgence. I did however use my experience of going to the local record shop which also happens to sell NES, SNES, Atari, Sega, and N64 games. I'm always amazed by the young people who are drawn to the classic consoles and games. I overhear a lot of conversations of teens who realize that they have indeed stumbled upon a goldmine. You're probably right that indy developers go for the 8~16 bit "feel" for nostalgia's sake. But there is still something to the old games. A few of my friends have younger brothers who have either discovered their brothers' old systems or who have gone out to buy a NES. And they're ecited about these games as if they were brand new. I really do think that there is something there.

As a vinyl collector myself, I'd like to explain my comparison. Some people say vinyl "sounds better." That's up to debate. A lossless digital file is pretty good. Sound quality also depends much more on recording techniques than whether the sounds are pressed onto vinyl or not. (There are, of course, exceptions to this. Some bands have recorded their music directly onto wax as opposed to magnetic tape... but I digress). A good speaker setup and free Pandora sounds better than a crappy turntable and a cheap preamp, even if hipsters insists that the vinyl sounds better. To me, the vinyl resurgence plays a little on nostalgia, yes. But more to it, people want something physical when they buy. CDs don't really offer an investment. Rip it to the computer and it's done. They're not worth much. But with vinyl, the packaging, the liner notes, the art, these all go into the sale of the album. There's something satisfying about the tactile nature of vinyl listening. Search for your album on the shelf, pull it out of the dust jacket, admire the art, place the needle, listen to half the album and follow along with the liner notes, get up, turn it over, replace the needle, pick up the album, place it in its sleeve, and put it back on the shelf. A wholly different experience than click iTunes and listen. I wonder if there isn't something similar going on with old games. The cartridge experience is similar, maybe?

This is me thinking as I type: not usually a good thing. I'm probably wrong. But I certainly didn't mean any animosity, Suffix. We've all had conversations here a lot more hard-hitting than this one.

But I like to think that TMK of the future might be a hub for those with memories of Mario games and an archive of those games all but lost to the contemporary gaming scene.
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The Chef

  • Simon Cowell
« Reply #8 on: December 02, 2014, 04:08:54 PM »
I think another big issue is the fact that people used to come to TMK for information, but now keep going to Mario Wiki instead (even though people with brains can tell Wikis are actually really stupid in practice!).

I've been trying to convince Deezer to give the Mariopedia a bit of an overhaul for this reason. I feel like it can and should be able to stand toe-to-toe with Mario Wiki at the very least. I really do want people to come here for Mario info again. There's gotta be a way to propel ourselves back into the average Internet surfer's eye, right?

« Reply #9 on: December 02, 2014, 09:16:22 PM »
Now that so much information has been consolidated into sites like the Mario Wiki, people have less reason to scour every Google result in search of information. As such, fewer curious fans to discover this forum. Had TMK been founded in 2007 rather than 1997, it would probably just be a Facebook group or Twitter feed.
YYur  waYur n beYur you Yur plusYur instYur an Yur Yur whaYur

BriGuy92

  • Luck of the Irish
« Reply #10 on: December 02, 2014, 10:59:54 PM »
Quote from: The Title
where is everyone?
I'm right here! I never left! I just don't post a lot.
Know the most important contribution of the organ Fund science girls type. It's true!

The Chef

  • Simon Cowell
« Reply #11 on: December 03, 2014, 01:04:28 AM »
Now that so much information has been consolidated into sites like the Mario Wiki, people have less reason to scour every Google result in search of information.

It still pains me that it's everyone's primary source. It's still terribly written, terribly organized and rife with baseless speculation and "trivia" that's not remotely even fact. I'm ok with having one place full of consolidated information, but it could at least be better-delivered and better-researched.

« Reply #12 on: December 03, 2014, 02:03:31 AM »
one place full of consolidated information, but it could at least be better-delivered and better-researched.

Like TMK!
Kinopio is the ultimate video game character! Who else can drive a kart, host parties, play tennis, give good advice and items, and is almost always happy??

Suffix

  • Steamed
« Reply #13 on: December 03, 2014, 06:40:29 AM »
No animosity here, I think this is a worthy discussion, anyhow.

Glad to hear it! I probably should have stuck a </facetious> tag on the end of the sentence, as it was more of a tired, mental nod to how people sometimes go off on rants in Youtube comments and such... Before I added that note, I actually did go on a long bit about games-as-spectacle, psychological game loops, and what not. I don't remember much of it now.

That's definitely a fun anecdote, it's nice to think that kids these days would see old consoles as treasure troves.

The Chef

  • Simon Cowell
« Reply #14 on: December 03, 2014, 03:27:11 PM »

« Reply #15 on: December 04, 2014, 07:26:00 AM »
Kids used to sign-up on forums en-masse because that was the only way they could talk about their favourite vidcons. Nodaway, the Tumblrs, Youtubes and Reddits fill that void and people go on wikis for information, which have left the straight informational fansites without a niche to define themselves, just as straight sites and forums did Usenet in eons ago.

Quote
I think another big issue is the fact that people used to come to TMK for information, but now keep going to Mario Wiki instead (even though people with brains can tell Wikis are actually really stupid in practice!).

[There used to be something much more vulgar and mean-spirited here, but on further reflexion, taking it to PMs is a better idea.]
« Last Edit: December 04, 2014, 11:25:18 AM by Glowsquid »

Suffix

  • Steamed
« Reply #16 on: December 04, 2014, 07:47:24 AM »
Usenet, there's an interesting parallel.

« Reply #17 on: December 04, 2014, 11:20:43 AM »
You know what TMK reminds me of? Tr's Rockin.
I just hope it doesn't suffer the same fate.
"These things... they take time."-Gaben

« Reply #18 on: December 04, 2014, 01:51:10 PM »
Quote from: Bulbapedia
In February 2011, TR Rose decided to close down the site, and is now focusing on her new website, MeowAbout Cosplay.

I somehow doubt we need worry about that.
YYur  waYur n beYur you Yur plusYur instYur an Yur Yur whaYur

« Reply #19 on: December 04, 2014, 10:57:15 PM »
People complaining about those lame ass clickbait websites should check out The Onion's new clickbait parody site, ClickHole.

As Suffix has put much better, I feel like websites like TMK aren't really "necessary" in today's climate. Just browsing TMK brings heartwarming nostalgia; it has basically the same layout as it's had for years (I remember this awesome black color scheme being here since I was 8, and I'm half-sure the format's exactly the same) and an old-fashioned forum with a community of jaded college students or even recent (or not-so recent!) graduates who were here in high school and possibly even before. (Except for younglings like me who were on this site way too young ;]) [dukar], TMK still hosts MIDIs! I have a really large MIDI and SoundFont collection on my computer, but I don't think anyone else on Earth does. Doesn't TMK still have one of those little official banners? You know, those really small gifs that Mario/Nintendo sites put on other Mario/Nintendo sites back then, so they could be like a network?

We aren't going to get many new members unless we do some kind of social media or YouTube thing. Like, a bunch of TMK users all post videos of them playing or showing off Mario games (spinoffs or otherwise) to the official TMK YouTube channel. Maybe Mario TAS stuff...pssh, like that would ever happen!

Just be glad TMK never went the way of NintendoLand, the ultimate old school Nintendo fansite that had a *****in' layout that fascinated younger me that's now reduced to just a forum. You can't even view it in the Wayback Machine without seizure inducing constant refreshes completely disrupting the experience! I'm glad TMK is what it is.
Relics.

Koopaslaya

  • Kansas
« Reply #20 on: December 05, 2014, 08:53:31 AM »
We aren't going to get many new members unless we do some kind of social media or YouTube thing. Like, a bunch of TMK users all post videos of them playing or showing off Mario games (spinoffs or otherwise) to the official TMK YouTube channel. Maybe Mario TAS stuff...pssh, like that would ever happen!

Well, that's the question, isn't it? What's the trajectory of this site? It's all a question of marketing and the integration of more contemporary media. And I don't think it's one that us regular members are able to answer. Far be it from me to order the staff about, but I do think somebody needs to have this conversation if the site is to remain relevant.
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Jman

  • Score
« Reply #21 on: December 05, 2014, 04:03:36 PM »
This man knows what's up. Granted, nostalgia's practically currency these days, but this site means a lot to me for that, if only because it represents things that meant a lot to me growing up. I still remember the chain of events that led me from searching for info on Shiguru Miyamoto for an elementary school class project to finding the ClassicGaming network, to checking out all the trivia and fan stuff in the TMK archives over several years, to finally joining the forums in 2007 after my old haunt "Nintendomain" tanked. I've seen a lot of fellow forums and favorite sites come, go, and get retooled in those years--for better or worse--so whether the Fungi Forums keeps attracting new blood or just becomes a ramshackle pub for aging Millenials to wax nostalgic, you can guarantee I'll be popping in on the daily until somebody brings the Super Mario Bros. 3-inspired curtain down on the stage.

Take out the part about the school project, and go a bit further back in time (to about '99 or so), and you basically have my journey to TMK in a nutshell.  I'd love to see this place once again become the juggernaut it (kinda) used to be. 
I always figured "Time to tip the scales" was Wario's everyday motto.

CrossEyed7

  • i can make this whatever i want; you're not my dad
« Reply #22 on: December 05, 2014, 10:48:00 PM »
NintendoLand
That reminds me, did I ever publicly apologize for stealing the TMK articles about Doki Doki Panic and Panel de Pon and submitting them to NintendoLand back when I was like nine? Because yeah, I don't know what the hell nine-year-old-me was thinking.

If TMK ever does die, I hope we at least die a more dignified death than SMBHQ (actually, to this day I'm still not sure if the poker thing was a serious sponsorship thing or some kind of postmodern joke or what; i mean, in 2009, their April Fools joke was putting fake Viagra ads on everything).
"Oh man, I wish being a part of a Mario fan community was the most embarrassing thing about my life." - Super-Jesse

The Chef

  • Simon Cowell
« Reply #23 on: December 06, 2014, 02:00:42 AM »
I've personally spoken to Metal Man. He says Kyle Orland completely went off the deep end after the site was left in his hands. The poker thing is dead-ass serious.

Jman

  • Score
« Reply #24 on: December 06, 2014, 11:45:19 AM »
That's sad.  I got years of entertainment out of both Nintendoland and SMBHQ.  The "Neglected Character Deathmatches" were among the first webcomics I ever read and were part of the inspiration for SSB Live (a pseudo-fanfic I did presenting Super Smash Bros. in a professional wrestling format).
I always figured "Time to tip the scales" was Wario's everyday motto.

« Reply #25 on: December 06, 2014, 12:33:52 PM »
Quote
He says Kyle Orland completely went off the deep end after the site was left in his hands. The poker thing is dead-ass serious.

 

The same Kyle Orland that's editor for Ars Technica? Huh.

The Chef

  • Simon Cowell
« Reply #26 on: December 06, 2014, 04:21:06 PM »
That much I wouldn't know.

Kimimaru

  • Max Stats
« Reply #27 on: December 06, 2014, 07:17:26 PM »
I really like this discussion. It's something I haven't thought much about previously.

I feel TMK provides its information at a much better quality than sites like MarioWiki. That is, it's clear, concise, and enjoyable to read. Although the quality of pages on MarioWiki aren't up to par with TMK, there's a lot more information available about the Mario series as a whole. On top of that, anyone can easily contribute to pages and share their knowledge.

In general, I think social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, and whatever else is out there have for the most part dominated online forums. For example, SmashBoards used to be the premier site for organizing Smash tournaments, but now people have moved away from it and shifted to Facebook Groups/Events. Convenience may be the biggest factor, considering Facebook is many people's central hub for social activity online.

I don't post here very often anymore because I too am a game designer/programmer and prefer to spend my free time working on personal projects. I still browse the forums every now and then, though.
The Mario series is the best! It has every genre in video games but RTS'! It also has a plumber who does different roles, a princess, and a lot of odd creatures who don't seem to poop!

ShadowBrain

  • Ridiculously relevant
« Reply #28 on: December 06, 2014, 09:40:24 PM »
We're like the small-time electronics store being pushed out of town by encroaching Apple stores. This could necessitate an 80's inspirational sports movie-style mission or videogame-centric "Be Kind Rewind."
"Mario is your oyster." ~The Chef

« Reply #29 on: December 06, 2014, 10:37:09 PM »
I'd try entering a SSB tournament as "[TMK] bobbysq" but searching TMK leads you to a company that makes pipes. Close enough? I'm also not actually affiliated with the site in any way except for being on the forums, but

But seriously, maybe we should look into a Twitch team or something.

« Reply #30 on: December 07, 2014, 02:22:42 AM »
If TMK ever does die, I hope we at least die a more dignified death than SMBHQ (actually, to this day I'm still not sure if the poker thing was a serious sponsorship thing or some kind of postmodern joke or what; i mean, in 2009, their April Fools joke was putting fake Viagra ads on everything).

Ouch. Not even a farewell note. My twelve-year-old self thoroughly enjoyed Neglected Charaters.

"Super Mario is probably the most popular game in the world. From kids to old people, everyone knows about this game. Year after year, Nintendo doesn't disappoint with Mario series game releases. I am officially addicted to this game. Another thing that I really enjoy and kind of addicted to is online poker. If you get going, there is easy cash to be made. That's why I like this game so much."

GOLD
YYur  waYur n beYur you Yur plusYur instYur an Yur Yur whaYur

« Reply #31 on: December 07, 2014, 04:34:56 PM »
oh my god

(also, I tried the mirror, it's down for now)

« Reply #32 on: December 08, 2014, 04:55:47 AM »
That reminds me, did I ever publicly apologize for stealing the TMK articles about Doki Doki Panic and Panel de Pon and submitting them to NintendoLand back when I was like nine? Because yeah, I don't know what the hell nine-year-old-me was thinking.

If TMK ever does die, I hope we at least die a more dignified death than SMBHQ (actually, to this day I'm still not sure if the poker thing was a serious sponsorship thing or some kind of postmodern joke or what; i mean, in 2009, their April Fools joke was putting fake Viagra ads on everything).
Yeah. Hopefully the forum falls more "awesomer" than THAT, if the forum falls at all.
My mind is telling me no... My body is telling me no too, just so you know.

« Reply #33 on: December 08, 2014, 04:57:38 AM »
We're like the small-time electronics store being pushed out of town by encroaching Apple stores. This could necessitate an 80's inspirational sports movie-style mission or videogame-centric "Be Kind Rewind."
I like the Apple metaphor, as a Samsung user myself. Maybe we could revamp the forums?
Also Horatio has been the latest member for a while.
My mind is telling me no... My body is telling me no too, just so you know.

« Reply #34 on: December 09, 2014, 09:25:20 PM »
Eight year old me's personal favorite thing on SMBHQ was BOTVGH!
Relics.

« Reply #35 on: December 16, 2014, 05:32:22 AM »
Seeing sites like SMBHQ and TRsRockin' in the current states, after having not visited them for so long, is rather like coming back to your childhood house to find they've ripped it down and turned it into a brothel.

(At least, that's the feeling I've got after reading this thread...)
If my son could decimate Lego cities with his genitals, I'd be [darn] proud.

« Reply #36 on: December 16, 2014, 04:27:58 PM »
This place hasn't felt like a brothel since Glorb left.
YYur  waYur n beYur you Yur plusYur instYur an Yur Yur whaYur

ShadowBrain

  • Ridiculously relevant
« Reply #37 on: December 17, 2014, 06:36:46 AM »
It felt like a harem, briefly.
"Mario is your oyster." ~The Chef

« Reply #38 on: December 18, 2014, 04:15:03 PM »
I've been lurking/posting on this forum since 2007. I was 11 when I registered here, and, being a little bit more grown up, it's really nice to see that this place is still going, even if it's a little quieter.

« Reply #39 on: January 04, 2015, 09:24:51 PM »
I'm in a similar boat, in a similar timeframe. Visiting these sites for the past 8 years, and saw the downhill slide of SMBHQ, SM128C, etc. Used to love fiddling around here all day. Too bad. Also, NC was awesome.

And the unceremonious and mysterious end to lemmy's land. 3 years ago, never forget.

The Chef

  • Simon Cowell
« Reply #40 on: January 05, 2015, 09:16:59 AM »
Oh yeah, I popped into Lemmy's Land official chatroom once. I found out that Lemmy decided to end the site without an official word because he just couldn't take the idiocy anymore. And then I promptly never went back to said chatroom because I couldn't take the idiocy either.

« Reply #41 on: January 06, 2015, 01:30:53 AM »
I remember when you guys joined, and the impact you each made upon arrival. At the time I never would have imagined that Weegee, Shadowbrain, The Chef, etc would become the new TEM, Suffix, Chupperson Weird, etc. simply because you were the newbies!

(that's not a personality comment, moreso about being the "forum regulars". and also I know Suffix is active again or something, but still)

I guess my point is, my impression of TMK is stuck in 2008 and you are all still newbies to me, and the fact that you're not is weird.

I'm curious: has any of you ever heard of Watoad?

Koopaslaya

  • Kansas
« Reply #42 on: January 06, 2015, 08:47:52 AM »
Umm... I still have to beat you in Mini Putt. I'm stil grinding.
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The Chef

  • Simon Cowell
« Reply #43 on: January 06, 2015, 08:54:00 AM »
Yes, I know who Watoad is. On occasion I'll even muse about whatever happened to him. Are any of the original staff or oldbies still in contact with him?

ShadowBrain

  • Ridiculously relevant
« Reply #44 on: January 06, 2015, 09:16:11 AM »
Well, I'm honored to have joined "the ranks," in some small capacity! :) "Watoad" rings a bell, but I couldn't quote a post for you.
"Mario is your oyster." ~The Chef

CrossEyed7

  • i can make this whatever i want; you're not my dad
« Reply #45 on: January 06, 2015, 08:05:53 PM »
I know the name, mostly because I had to find a picture of him for the Poster of the Decade certificates, but I don't think there was any overlap between our time on here.
"Oh man, I wish being a part of a Mario fan community was the most embarrassing thing about my life." - Super-Jesse

Suffix

  • Steamed
« Reply #46 on: January 06, 2015, 10:46:09 PM »
Yes, I know who Watoad is. On occasion I'll even muse about whatever happened to him. Are any of the original staff or oldbies still in contact with him?

I have a standing invitation to go see him in northern Tokyo.

The Chef

  • Simon Cowell
« Reply #47 on: January 07, 2015, 09:52:04 AM »
What's he up to? Has he worked his way to the top of the Japanese corporate world?

Suffix

  • Steamed
« Reply #48 on: January 07, 2015, 07:27:58 PM »
If I remember correctly, he's living a comfortable city life doing translation work. I rather envy him for being able to work from home.

The Chef

  • Simon Cowell
« Reply #49 on: January 07, 2015, 07:29:19 PM »
Lucky stiff. He should get on here and help us translate stuff. :P

Suffix

  • Steamed
« Reply #50 on: January 07, 2015, 08:22:53 PM »
Hey, I had a stint as an J->E translator before I came to Japan, and let me tell you, the more you do it, the less you want to do it.

The Chef

  • Simon Cowell
« Reply #51 on: January 07, 2015, 09:09:53 PM »
I dunno, Clyde Mandelin aka Mato of Legends of Localization seems to love his job to pieces.

« Reply #52 on: January 10, 2015, 05:17:47 PM »
Speaking of which, that dude really needs to hurry up on the next AVGN Topics installment.
Relics.

« Reply #53 on: November 30, 2017, 02:46:59 AM »
Just a random question. Is it frowned upon to post in/restart old threads?
Bowser impostor in 5-4; Japanese god in real life!

« Reply #54 on: November 30, 2017, 06:47:09 PM »
Only if the bump isn't worthwhile.
YYur  waYur n beYur you Yur plusYur instYur an Yur Yur whaYur

« Reply #55 on: January 30, 2019, 08:34:39 AM »
I'm in a similar boat, in a similar timeframe. Visiting these sites for the past 8 years, and saw the downhill slide of SMBHQ, SM128C, etc. Used to love fiddling around here all day. Too bad. Also, NC was awesome.

And the unceremonious and mysterious end to lemmy's land. 3 years ago, never forget.

SM128C has been back for the past year as a (sort-of) blog now! :D

I do agree with how fan sites are kind of irrelevant now, everyone is just into click-baity stuff and social media stuff like Facebook and Reddit. It's sad in a way, but I revived SM128C as a more traditional style commentary.

MarioWiki is pretty good in that it has a lot of info, but yeah I have to say the quality isn't exactly the best, and it's being almost treated like gospel. It sucks how we don't have a lot of great quality resources because people are just too impatient nowadays.

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